Cambio - Excellence in Molecular Biology

Molecular Cloning Kits

Molecular Cloning Kits: Cloning Kits

CopyControl™ Fosmid Library Production Kit

The CopyControl Fosmid Library Production Kit provides an efficient and improved method for preparing a library of cosmid-sized (approximately 40kb) clones. The CopyControl pCC1FOS provided in the kit contains both a single copy origin of replication and the inducible multiple copy oriV origin of replication for complete control of clone copy number

BioSearch Tech (Lucigen/Epicentre)

Catalogue No.DescriptionPack SizePriceQty
CCFOS059CopyControl™ HTP Fosmid Library Production Kit1 Kit £645.00£645.00Offer until : 31-Dec-2020Contact Cambio for special pricing on all orders over £2000 View Offer Quantity Add to Order
CCFOS110CopyControl™ Fosmid Library Production Kit1 Kit £618.00£618.00Offer until : 31-Dec-2020Contact Cambio for special pricing on all orders over £2000 View Offer Quantity Add to Order

CopyControl™ Fosmid Library Production Kit

The CopyControl Fosmid Library Production Kit provides an efficient and improved method for preparing a library of cosmid-sized (approximately 40kb) clones. The CopyControl pCC1FOS provided in the kit contains both a single copy origin of replication and the inducible multiple copy oriV origin of replication for complete control of clone copy number

BioSearch Tech (Lucigen/Epicentre)

fficient and improved systems for constructing libraries of approximately 40 kb clones in both standard or high-throughput screening versions.

  • Prepare unbiased fosmid libraries with a complete kit, including GELase enzyme and MaxPlax Lambda Packaging Extracts
  • Stabilize clones with copy number control
  • Optimize high-throughput end-sequencing results with CopyControl HTP Fosmid Library Production Kit

Applications

  • Preparation of complete and unbiased fosmid libraries, from any biological sample, that can be maintained at single-copy number and induced to high-copy number as needed, using the CopyControl™ Autoinduction Solution.
  • Construction of metagenomic libraries from microbes present in environmental samples such as water and soil.

The CopyControl™ Fosmid Library Production Kits* provide an efficient and improved method for constructing a library of approximately 40 kb clones. The CopyControl pCC1FOS™ Vector contains both the E. coli F-factor single-copy origin of replication and the inducible high-copy oriV (Fig. 1). CopyControl Fosmid clones are typically grown at single copy to ensure insert stability and successful cloning of encoded and expressed toxic protein and unstable DNA sequences. The CopyControl Fosmid clones can then be induced up to 50 copies per cell immediately before DNA purification. This step greatly increases DNA yields, while maintaining the stability of the plasmid.

The CopyControl HTP Fosmid Library contains the pCC2FOS™ Vector which is designed to optimize end-sequencing results, especially in a high-throughput setting. The primer cassette, engineered in conjunction with Agencourt Bioscience Corporation, eliminates wasteful and expensive vector sequence reads by having the 3´ ends of the primer-annealing sites only three bases from the vector/insert junction. In addition, the seven-base sequence at the 3´ end of each primer was specifically designed to minimize mispriming to any contaminating E. coli DNA present after template purification (Fig. 2).

The kit uses a strategy of cloning blunt-ended DNA fragments generated by random shearing of the DNA, to produce more complete and unbiased genomic libraries than can be obtained by partial restriction endonuclease digests. Genomic DNA is first sheared into approximately 40-kb fragments. The sheared DNA is end-repaired to generate blunt, 5´-phosphorylated ends and then size-selected by and recovered from a low-melting-point agarose gel. Finally, the size-selected DNA is ligated into the cloning-ready CopyControl pCC1FOS or pCC2FOS Vector, packaged using ultra-high efficiency MaxPlax™ Lambda Packaging Extracts (>109 pfu/µg DNA), included in the kit, and plated on the supplied TransforMax™ EPI300™ E. coli (Fig. 3).

Figure 1. CopyControl™ Vector map. The CopyControl pCC1FOS™ and pCC2FOS™ Vectors for CopyControl Fosmid library production are supplied linearized at the Eco72 I (blunt) site and then dephosphorylated. The vector is ready for cloning end-repaired (blunt-end) genomic DNA of approximately 40 kb.

Figure 2. The CopyControl™ pCC2FOS™ Vector primer cassette. The vector differs from the pCC1FOS Vector by the engineering of a new primer cassette that eliminates wasteful vector-derived sequencing reads and minimizes the potential for priming on the E. coli genome.

Benefits

  • CopyControl pCC1FOS and pCC2FOS Vectors are supplied Cloning-Ready: linearized, dephosphorylated, purified, and ready for ligation.
  • No need for partial restriction endonuclease digests or pulse field gel electrophoresis to prepare the genomic DNA for cloning.
  • Maximize high-throughput end-sequence results using the pCC2FOS Vector (Fig. 4).
  • Clones can be induced from single copy up to 50 copies per cell (Fig. 5). Safely obtain higher DNA yields while maintaining the stability of single-copy-number clones.
  • High-efficiency lambda packaging eliminates background and false positives.
  • "Hands-off" autoinduction protocol is perfect for high-throughput applications.
  • Faster and easier than BAC cloning.

Figure 3 (click to enlarge). Overview of the process for preparing a fosmid library using the CopyControl™ Fosmid Library Production Kits. Once the library has been prepared, individual clones can be cultured in small volume and induced to multiple-copy number for high yields of high-purity DNA for fingerprinting, sequencing, etc., using Epicentre's DirectLysis Fosmid96 kit or FosmidMAX™ DNA Purification Kit.

Figure 4. Typical sequencing results obtained with the pCC2FOS™ Forward Primer on a pCC2FOS™ clone at 1/48x BigDye™ dilution. Similar results were obtained with the pCC2FOS Reverse Primer (data not shown).

Citations

  1. FEMS Microbiol Lett 284 (2008) 28-34

*Covered by issued and/or pending patents

 

 

 

 




If you cannot find the answer to your problem below then please contact us or telephone 01954 210 200

CopyControl™ Fosmid Library Production Kit

The CopyControl Fosmid Library Production Kit provides an efficient and improved method for preparing a library of cosmid-sized (approximately 40kb) clones. The CopyControl pCC1FOS provided in the kit contains both a single copy origin of replication and the inducible multiple copy oriV origin of replication for complete control of clone copy number

BioSearch Tech (Lucigen/Epicentre)

Protocols for: CopyControl™ Fosmid Library Production

Due to the constant updating of the protocols by the manufacturer we have provided a direct link to Lucigen’s product page, where the latest protocol is available.
Please note this will open a new page or window on your computer.
(catalogue number CCFOS110)
Please note: all protocols off site are the responsibility of the products supplier

If you cannot find the answer to your problem below then please contact us or telephone 01954 210 200

CopyControl™ Fosmid Library Production Kit

The CopyControl Fosmid Library Production Kit provides an efficient and improved method for preparing a library of cosmid-sized (approximately 40kb) clones. The CopyControl pCC1FOS provided in the kit contains both a single copy origin of replication and the inducible multiple copy oriV origin of replication for complete control of clone copy number

BioSearch Tech (Lucigen/Epicentre)

Customer References

CCFOS110 (1 Kit)

"Excellent product. High quality and high yielding results. Would recommend and buy it again. Highly satisfied"
-Dr Mahmut Tor Warwick HRI

References

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If you cannot find the answer to your problem below then please contact us or telephone 01954 210 200

CopyControl™ Fosmid Library Production Kit

The CopyControl Fosmid Library Production Kit provides an efficient and improved method for preparing a library of cosmid-sized (approximately 40kb) clones. The CopyControl pCC1FOS provided in the kit contains both a single copy origin of replication and the inducible multiple copy oriV origin of replication for complete control of clone copy number

BioSearch Tech (Lucigen/Epicentre)

Applications

  • Preparation of complete and unbiased fosmid libraries, from any biological sample, that can be maintained at single-copy number and induced to high-copy number as needed, using the CopyControl™ Autoinduction Solution.
  • Construction of metagenomic libraries from microbes present in environmental samples such as water and soil.

 

Benefits

  • CopyControl Vectors are supplied ready for ligation.
  • No need for partial restriction endonuclease digests or pulse field gel electrophoresis
  • Clones can be induced from single copy up to 50 copies per cell .
  • Safely obtain higher DNA yields while maintaining the stability of single-copy-number clones.
  • Background and false positives.eliminated.
  • Faster and easier than BAC cloning.

If you cannot find the answer to your problem below then please contact us or telephone 01954 210 200

CopyControl™ Fosmid Library Production Kit

The CopyControl Fosmid Library Production Kit provides an efficient and improved method for preparing a library of cosmid-sized (approximately 40kb) clones. The CopyControl pCC1FOS provided in the kit contains both a single copy origin of replication and the inducible multiple copy oriV origin of replication for complete control of clone copy number

BioSearch Tech (Lucigen/Epicentre)

If you cannot find the answer to your problem below then please contact us or telephone 01954 210 200