Cambio - Excellence in Molecular Biology

Molecular Cloning Kits

Molecular Cloning Kits: Cloning Kits

End-It™ DNA End-Repair Kit

The End-It DNA End-Repair Kit is used to convert DNA containing damaged or incompatible 5'- and/or 3'-protruding ends that result from shearing, restriction endonuclease digestion or PCR amplification to 5'-phosphorylated, blunt-end DNA for fast and efficient blunt-end cloning into plasmid, cosmid, fosmid, BAC or other vectors.

BioSearch Tech (Lucigen/Epicentre)

Catalogue No.DescriptionPack SizePriceQty
ER0720End-It™ DNA End-Repair Kit20 reactions £112.00 Quantity Add to Order
ER81050End-It™ DNA End-Repair Kit50 Reactions £216.00 Quantity Add to Order

End-It™ DNA End-Repair Kit

The End-It DNA End-Repair Kit is used to convert DNA containing damaged or incompatible 5'- and/or 3'-protruding ends that result from shearing, restriction endonuclease digestion or PCR amplification to 5'-phosphorylated, blunt-end DNA for fast and efficient blunt-end cloning into plasmid, cosmid, fosmid, BAC or other vectors.

BioSearch Tech (Lucigen/Epicentre)

The End-It™ DNA End-Repair Kit is used to convert DNA containing damaged or incompatible 5'- and/or 3'-protruding ends that result from shearing, restriction endonuclease digestion or PCR amplification to 5'-phosphorylated, blunt-end DNA for fast and efficient blunt-end cloning into plasmid, cosmid, fosmid, BAC or other vectors. The conversion to blunt-end DNA is accomplished by exploiting the 5'→3' polymerase and 5'Æ3' exonuclease activities of T4 DNA Polymerase. T4 Polynucleotide Kinase and ATP are also included in the kit for phosphorylation of the 5'-ends of the blunt-ended DNA for subsequent ligation into a cloning vector. The End-It™ DNA End-Repair Kit is identical to the End-Repair Enzyme Mix provided in the pWEB™ Cosmid Cloning Kit, the pWEB-TNC™ Cosmid Cloning Kit, and the EpiFOS™ Fosmid Library Production Kit and the CopyControl™ Fosmid Library Production Kit.

The End-It™ DNA End-Repair Kit contains reagents for 20 end-repair reactions (repair of up to 100µg of genomic DNA). The end-repaired, 5'-phosphorylated DNA can be efficiently ligated into a blunt-end, dephosphorylated cloning vector using the Fast-Link™ DNA Ligation Kit.

Figure 1. DNA fragments containing any type of ends are rapidly and efficiently converted to 5'-phosphorylated, blunt-ended DNA using the End-It DNA End-Repair Kit. Figure 1. DNA fragments containing any type of ends are rapidly and efficiently converted to 5'-phosphorylated, blunt-ended DNA using the End-It™ DNA End-Repair Kit. The end-repaired DNA is ready for blunt-end ligation into the cloning vector of choice using, for example EPICENTRE®'s Fast-Link™ DNA Ligation Kit.

If you cannot find the answer to your problem below then please contact us or telephone 01954 210 200

End-It™ DNA End-Repair Kit

The End-It DNA End-Repair Kit is used to convert DNA containing damaged or incompatible 5'- and/or 3'-protruding ends that result from shearing, restriction endonuclease digestion or PCR amplification to 5'-phosphorylated, blunt-end DNA for fast and efficient blunt-end cloning into plasmid, cosmid, fosmid, BAC or other vectors.

BioSearch Tech (Lucigen/Epicentre)

Protocols for: End-It™ DNA End-Repair Kit

Due to the constant updating of the protocols by the manufacturer we have provided a direct link to Lucigen’s product page, where the latest protocol is available.

Please note this will open a new page or window on your computer.

 End-It™ Protocol

(catalogue number ER0720, ER81050)

Please note: all protocols off site are the responsibility of the products supplier

If you cannot find the answer to your problem below then please contact us or telephone 01954 210 200

End-It™ DNA End-Repair Kit

The End-It DNA End-Repair Kit is used to convert DNA containing damaged or incompatible 5'- and/or 3'-protruding ends that result from shearing, restriction endonuclease digestion or PCR amplification to 5'-phosphorylated, blunt-end DNA for fast and efficient blunt-end cloning into plasmid, cosmid, fosmid, BAC or other vectors.

BioSearch Tech (Lucigen/Epicentre)

References:

 

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If you cannot find the answer to your problem below then please contact us or telephone 01954 210 200

End-It™ DNA End-Repair Kit

The End-It DNA End-Repair Kit is used to convert DNA containing damaged or incompatible 5'- and/or 3'-protruding ends that result from shearing, restriction endonuclease digestion or PCR amplification to 5'-phosphorylated, blunt-end DNA for fast and efficient blunt-end cloning into plasmid, cosmid, fosmid, BAC or other vectors.

BioSearch Tech (Lucigen/Epicentre)

Applications

  • Repair sheared, nebulized, or restriction enzyme-digested genomic DNA for: preparation of templates for next-gen sequencing; or shotgun library preparation.

 

Benefits

  • The repaired DNA is blunt-ended and 5´-phosphorylated for immediate blunt-end ligation.
  • The high specific activity of the End-Repair Enzyme Mix provides complete conversion of protruding ends to 5´-phosphorylated, blunt-ended DNA.

If you cannot find the answer to your problem below then please contact us or telephone 01954 210 200